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Research Article
Influence of Different Fertilization and Harvest Time on Growth, Head Characters and Nutrition Quality of Endive under Sandy Soil

D.Y. Abd- Elkader and Shimaa M. Hassan

American Journal of Plant Physiology, 2016, 11(1-3), 23-32.

Abstract

Aim: The study aim is to investigate the effect of different fertilization and harvesting time on the growth, head characters and nutrition quality on endive under sandy soil. Methodology: A field experiments were carried out during the winter seasons 2013/2014 and 2014/2015 to study the influence of different fertilization like mineral nitrogen and biofertilizer alone or in combination and time of day for harvest on growth, head character and nutritional quality of endive. Growth characters like plant height, number of leaves per plant and leaves dry matter (%) were significantly influenced by different fertilization treatments. However, plant height and number of leaves per plant characters were insignificant differences affected by time of day harvest, in both growing seasons. But the highest leaves dry matter (%) was obtained when plant harvest at midday (in the afternoon) in both growing seasons. Whereas the head weight and head diameter attributing characters were significantly influenced by different fertilization treatments. Significantly maximum head weight (g) and head diameter (cm) were recorded by 100% mineral nitrogen fertilizer followed by 75% mineral nitrogen fertilizer. Results: Also, the results reflected that the best time of harvest that gave the significant highest mean value of this characters were given by using the evening harvest, in both growing seasons. The highest nutritional quality parameters like total phenol, TSS and ascorbic acid were obtained when plant received 100% biofertilizer and afternoon harvest, in the both seasons. The data showed that there was significant effect of different fertilization treatments on total chlorophyll content. In both seasons, the highest value was obtained with 100% mineral nitrogen. The data, also indicated that there were no significant effects of all harvesting time treatment on total chlorophyll content.

ASCI-ID: 10-228

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