Research Article
In vitro Study of Antidermatophytic Activity of Mint (Mentha Piperita) Against Trichophyton rubrum and Microsporum canis

Avinash Marwal, Surendra Meena, Subhash Chandra and Anima Sharma

Journal of Medical Sciences, 2012, 12(6), 182-187.

Abstract

Dermatophytes as the name suggest are the fungus that feed on skin. The chief source of their growth is keratin which is widely available in skin, nails and hairs. Here we have evaluated an In vitro study of antidermatophytic activity of Mint (Mentha piperita) against two dermatophytes i.e., Trichophyton rubrum and Microsporum canis. The data in the manuscript is very much helpful in curing dermatophytic infections as an application from Biotechnological point of view. Distribution of Trichophyton rubrum and Microsporum canis was found to be 19.23 and 32.69%, respectively. At variable temperature Trichophyton rubrum and Microsporum canis showed maximum growth at 37°C (0.23 and 0.19 g dry weight of mycelium, respectively). At variable pH Trichophyton rubrum showed maximum growth at pH 7.5 and 8.0 (0.32 g dry weight of mycelium) and Microsporum canis showed maximum growth at pH 7.5 (0.39 g dry weight of mycelium). Mentha piperita highest keratinase activity against Microsporum canis was found to be 2.99 unit mL-1 with 2.91 mg mL-1 extracellular release of protein and in Trichophyton rubrum it was found to be 2.99 unit mL-1 with 2.75 mg mL-1 extracellular release of protein.

ASCI-ID: 41-1102

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